SMD Resistor Code Calculator App

SMD stands for Surface Mounted Device. An SMD is any electronic component that is made to use with SMT, or Surface Mount Technology. SMT was developed to meet the ongoing desire for printed circuit board manufacture to use smaller components and be faster, more efficient, and cheaper. This app provides a very simple and efficient way to calculate SMD resistor code.
BASIC FEATURES:-
1. Simple Interface.
2. Light Weight.
3. E-96 SMD resistor code has included.
4. Underlined SMD resistor code has included.
5. Supports both 3 and 4 digits.
HOW TO INSTALL:
Go to Play Store
Type
SMD Resistor Code Calculator
Then
Search
Select: SMD Resistor Code Calculator and install in your Android Mobile phone, or to install this app click here.

How to calculate the value of an SMD resistor:
Most chip resistors are marked with a 3-digit or 4-digit code — the numerical equivalent of the familiar color code for through-hole components. Recently, a new coding system (the EIA-96) has appeared on precision SMDs.
The 3-digit code
Standard-tolerance SMD resistors are marked with a simple 3-digit code. The first two numbers will indicate the significant digits, and the third will be the multiplier, telling you the power of ten to which the two significant digits must be multiplied (or how many zeros to add). Resistances of less than 10 ohms do not have a multiplier, the letter ‘R’ is used instead to indicate the position of the decimal point.
3-digit code examples:
220 = 22 x 100 (1) = 22Ω (not 220Ω!)
471 = 47 x 101 (10) = 470Ω
102 = 10 x 102 (100) = 1000Ω or 1kΩ
3R3 = 3.3Ω
The 4-digit code
The 4-digit code is used for marking precision surface mount resistors. It’s similar to the previous system, the only difference is the number of significant digits: the first three numbers will tell us the significant digits, and the fourth will be the multiplier, indicating the power of ten to which the three significant digits must be multiplied (or how many zeros to add). Resistances of less than 100 ohms are marked with the help of the letter ‘R’, indicating the position of the decimal point.
4-digit code examples:
4700 = 470 x 100 (1) = 470Ω (not 4700Ω!)
2001 = 200 x 101 (10) = 2000Ω or 2kΩ
1002 = 100 x 102 (100) = 10000Ω or 10kΩ
15R0 = 15.0Ω
For more details and install this app click here.

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